13
February
2015
|
06:00 AM
America/New_York

How the Power is Restored

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Lights out? Chances are, weather caused it. Sixty-five percent of power outages for Jackson EMC members are triggered by the weather. Winter ice storms, a string of tornadoes or a summer downpour after weeks of drought can disrupt the flow of energy powering our homes, schools, businesses and factories.

Line crews battle the elements to find problem areas and restore service as quickly and safely as possible. Generally, the first lines to fail are the first to be repaired but efforts are made to restore power to the largest number of members as quickly as possible. Then, crews fix problems affecting smaller groups of members. Workers have to find the problem, then they follow a series of steps to bring the lights back on.

  1. Smart meters connect to our integrated computer system and provide a steady flow of information to our 24/7 system control center.
     
  2. System Control is monitored 24/7 by technicians who manage the service for all of JEMC’s 215,000+ members. These employees also pay close attention to the weather and the larger electric grid energizing the lines. This attention allows them to plan for potential risks to your energy supply and possibly repair lines before you ever realize an outage has occurred.
     
  3. Line crews are dispatched from district offices to repair the lines once a problem is recorded through our outage management system or a customer calls to report an outage. Day or night, linemen work long hours, often in hazardous weather, to restore your power.
     
  4. Transmission towers and cables that supply power to thousands of consumers rarely fail. But when damage occurs, these facilities must be repaired before other parts of the system can operate.
     
  5. Distribution substations serve hundreds or thousands of members. JEMC has 79 substations. When a major outage occurs, line crews inspect substations to discover if problems stem from transmission lines feeding into the substation, the substation itself, or if there are problems down the line. Problems corrected at the substation often restore power to a large number of people at once
     
  6. Distribution lines are inspected next. Extending from substations, these lines supply towns, housing developments and other large groups of customers.
     
  7. Supply lines or tap lines that deliver power to transformers, either mounted on poles or placed on pads for underground service, outside businesses, schools and homes are repaired next, bringing power back to those members farthest from the substation.
     
  8. Individual homes and businesses where damage has occurred to the service line between your house and the transformer are rare. In this instance, your neighbor’s lights would be on while yours are still dark. Crews will repair your service once they’ve restored power for other large sections of customers.
     
  9. Supply lines or tap lines that deliver power to transformers, either mounted on poles or placed on pads for underground service, outside businesses, schools and homes are repaired next, bringing power back to those members farthest from the substation.
     
  10. Individual homes and businesses where damage has occurred to the service line between your house and the transformer are rare. In this instance, your neighbor’s lights would be on while yours are still dark. Crews will repair your service once they’ve restored power for other large sections of customers.